Book Review: Zipporah






























Heyy guys. it's been too long since my last [proper] post. But all is well thank God! I'm gonna be doing a review today on the book written by Marek Halter called Zipporah [Canaan Trilogy] Please bear in mind that although it is based on a biblical character, the story itself is not biblical. I'm going to try real hard not to give the story itself away - Just in case you plan on reading it!

The book focuses on a character in the old Testemant, a character almost buried in the midst of all the ongoings in the surrounding area. Zipporah, the wife of Moses is described as the daughter of a Midianite Priest and a Cushite woman who Moses falls head over heels with despite her dark complexion.
Zipporah is portrayed as a strong character and almost stubborn but full of wisdom (Which Moses is said to have fallen in love with first). However she never seems to 'lose control' - so to speak - Given the hardships she has been through, her harsh but timid ways are to be expected.

As an outcast of society how Moses and Zipporah end up together is one that Halter has deviously embedded. Perhaps it was this that drew them together. The fact that Moses was escaping from his past and Zipporah - Their differences is what created their relationship. Speaking of which; their relationship is quite an interesting one. Rather than creating a predictable and perfect relationship (which often seem to be the case in drama/romance novels) Halter has cleverly highlighted their faults in bold, Zipporah's stubbornness, Moses' anger, their sexual relationship before marriage; which adds a raw effect to the story in total. However this heartwarming story does not end this way.In contrary to popular belief, Zipporah's trials and harships fail to strengthen her character - They are in turn the things that end her sorrowful life.

Overall I think this book is beautifully written, considering the book is 75% narrated by Zipporah herself (but is written by a Marek Halter)- Halter has put himself through the eyes of a woman that was tortured throughout her lifetime and told a story that none of us would guess. This book certainly gives a plausible explanation of who Zipporah was and what she stood for.
I would strongly (emphasis on the strongly) regard this book as fiction and fiction only, though there some elements in there which feature certain bible verses. I wouldn't use it as a foundation on studying Bible characters.